Small Bite: Easy corn off the cob

” Please do not remove any fingers in the process “

There’s nothing quite like fresh corn. I always like to have a few ears on hand whenever it’s in season – it goes with just about anything. One of my favorite ways to prepare (and eat) corn is to cut it off of the cob and sauté in a skillet with some butter and black pepper. Cutting the corn from the cob isn’t a particularly difficult task, but it can be a bit tricky to do it neatly. I can’t take credit for this technique, but to be honest I’m not sure who can, therefore I’ll go ahead and take all the credit. Thanks.

A bowl in a bowl. So meta.

A bowl in a bowl. So meta.

To keep corn from flying all over your kitchen counter, you’ll need two bowls: one very large and one relatively small. Turn the smaller bowl upside-down and place it inside the larger bowl, stand an ear of corn against the bottom of smaller bowl, and (carefully) cut the kernels off the cob with a very sharp knife. Please do not remove any fingers in the process, and don’t push down too hard with the knife as the corn cobs tend to get rather slippery after a bit of cutting.

Observe photo above. Add corn. Process complete.

Observe photo above. Add corn. Process complete.

The good news is that you now have a bowl full of neatly cut corn kernels, all while keeping your countertops clean. The bad news is that you have an extra bowl to wash, but I’d call that a fair trade.


Nonstandard Disclaimer of Randomness
The vegetable cutting technique detailed in this post involves the use of both a sharp knife and a cerebral cortex, so if you are an idiot please do not attempt. If any part of this post confuses you, please see the previous sentence.


Sweet corn spoonbread

” It’s the hybrid, half-baked lovechild of cornbread and creamed corn “

Spoonbread is apparently a real thing. I had never heard of it before seeing a recipe on Pinterest (this one in fact), but after consulting a few people it seems I’ve been living under a rock. It’s too bad, because I’ve really been missing out. Spoonbread is good.

Skip to the short version

This is one of those 'dump and stir' kind of recipes. It's awesome.

This is one of those ‘dump and stir’ kind of recipes. It’s awesome.

What is spoonbread? The name alone describes it about as well as I could hope to, but I’ll still give it a shot. Spoonbread is the hybrid, half-baked lovechild of cornbread and creamed corn, raised in the wilderness by a pack of untamed bread puddings. It is sweet and stick-to-your-ribs tasty, but not quite a dessert. It’s just about the most perfect side dish for a meal of barbecue that I can imagine. This recipe is just begging to be put in a Dutch oven and lovingly baked in a smoker alongside a slab of brisket or baby back ribs.


Ingredients

  • 1 box Jiffy corn muffin mix (8.5oz)
  • 1 can cream style corn (14.75oz)
  • 1 can whole kernel corn, drained (15oz)
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt


Other stuff you’ll need

  • a 2 quart casserole dish
  • something to grease the casserole dish with


Directions

As you may have noticed, pretty much all of the ingredients are yellow. Hey, there’s nothing wrong with color-coordinated recipes, provided they taste good. And this one does.

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F. Dump all of the ingredients into a mixing bowl and stir until you have attained a large mass of evenly-mixed yellow goo. Grease your casserole dish, pour in the goo, and bake for 35 to 40 minutes.

Goo in a casserole dish.

Goo in a casserole dish.

The spoonbread is done when it has “set”, meaning it is not liquidy and has the same approximate texture as bread pudding or underdone cake. If the top is a little browned, it’s probably done.

And this is what it looks like when it's done.

And this is what it looks like when it’s done.

Dish it up, eat it, and enjoy. If anyone you serve it to doesn’t like it, kick them out of your house.

Looks good enough to eat, right? Believe me, it is.

Looks good enough to eat, right? Believe me, it is.




tl;dr

Sweet corn spoonbread

Ingredients

  • 1 box Jiffy corn muffin mix (8.5oz)
  • 1 can cream style corn (14.75oz)
  • 1 can whole kernel corn, drained (15oz)
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt


Other stuff you’ll need

  • a 2 quart casserole dish
  • something to grease the casserole dish with


Directions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Combine ingredients until evenly mixed and pour into a 2 quart casserole dish. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until spoonbread has set.



See also


Turkey Herder Pie

With bare cupboards, a grumbling stomach, and no idea what to make for dinner, I somehow managed to throw this shepherd’s pie clone together in about 45 minutes. To my utmost astonishment, it didn’t suck. I quickly grabbed a pad of paper and scribbled down the recipe, and because I’m super nice I’m going to share it with you.

Skip to the short version

A completely non-authentic shepherd's pie rip off. We loved it.

A completely non-authentic shepherd’s pie rip off. We loved it.

It was just another regular old Sunday night at home, and there was nothing to eat. The pantry, freezer, and refrigerator were all in that familiar “blah” phase that takes places right before one drags oneself to the store to restock. Just as I was lamenting the grocery situation, my wife Shawn said, “Doesn’t shepherd’s pie sound good?”

” Fire up the broiler and show those stupid potatoes who’s boss “

We had barely any food in the house at all, so shepherd’s pie was very unlikely. “Oh sure, and why don’t we ask Bruce Willis to deliver some for us in a free Rolls Royce?” I said. Well, that’s what my brain wanted to say. My mouth, being tired of constantly getting into trouble thanks to my brain, decided instead to say “Sure, I’ll see what I can come up with.” My brain was horrified. Shawn was right though, shepherd’s pie did sound good.

There are a bajillion recipes out there, each one a little different, but there are some common themes. In a typical shepherd’s pie (aka, cottage pie), there is usually some kind of meat simmered in broth and Worcestershire sauce, some kind of vegetable, cheese or cream, onions, and mashed potatoes. I rummaged the freezer again and came up with some ground turkey I had forgotten about. The spice rack yielded beef bouillon powder and some dehydrated onions, and the pantry coughed up a box of instant potatoes and a can of corn. Well whaddya know. Rock and roll.


Ingredients

  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 tbsp dehydrated minced onions
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp beef bouillon dissolved in 1 cup hot water (or 1 cup beef broth)
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp ground thyme
  • 1 tsp sweet paprika
  • 1 can of corn, drained
  • 1 cup grated cheese (cheddar is best)
  • 2 cups prepared instant mashed potatoes


Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Brown the turkey in a skillet with the olive oil, dehydrated onions, and garlic powder, being careful not to overcook. When the turkey is barely done (don’t worry, it’ll cook quite a bit longer), add the boullion or broth, Worcestershire sauce, black pepper, thyme, and paprika. Stir well and simmer uncovered until most of the liquid has evaporated, about 10 or 15 minutes. Salt to taste and remove from heat.

This is an obligatory picture of cheese.

This is an obligatory picture of cheese.

Layer the meat mixture in the bottom of a 13×9 casserole dish and cover with the drained corn. Add the cheese in another even layer, and then carefully spread the mashed potatoes over all of that using a rubber spatula. If you want to get fancy (and who doesn’t), take a fork and lightly scrape the top of the mashed potatoes to give it some texture. The resulting tiny little peaks of mashed potato will get toasty, ramping up the “Wow, look what you made!” factor.

Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the potatoes are browned. If they still aren’t browned after 25 minutes, fire up the broiler and show those stupid potatoes who’s boss. Remove from oven, dish up generous scoops of meaty goodness onto whatever plates you happen to have clean, and do be careful not to sear the flesh from the roof of your mouth. If you can come up with a better name than “Turkey Herder Pie”, I’m all ears. That was the best Shawn and I could come up with while under the influence of a respectable post-dinner food coma.

Super awesome tip: If you have a Dutch oven (tee hee), you can make this entire recipe in the one piece of cookware without having to do the skillet-to-baking-dish transfer thing.

Mmm, I do love me some tiny little toasty peaks of mashed potato.

Mmm, I do love me some tiny little toasty peaks of mashed potato.



tl;dr

Turkey herder pie

Ingredients

  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 tbsp dehydrated minced onions
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp beef bouillon dissolved in 1 cup hot water (or 1 cup beef broth)
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp ground thyme
  • 1 tsp sweet paprika
  • 1 can of corn, drained
  • 1 cup grated cheese (cheddar is best)
  • 2 cups prepared instant mashed potatoes


Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Brown turkey in a skillet with the olive oil, dehydrated onions, and garlic powder. Add boullion or broth, Worcestershire sauce, black pepper, thyme, and paprika. Stir well and simmer uncovered for 10 or 15 minutes, until most of the liquid has evaporated. Salt to taste and remove from heat. Layer meat mixture in the bottom of a 13×9 casserole dish. Cover with drained corn, then cheese, then mashed potato. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until mashed potato layer is lightly browned.



See also